Why are the UN, China and the WEF moving against Farmers Worldwide?

The escalating regulatory assault on agricultural producers from the Netherlands and the United States to Sri Lanka and beyond is closely linked to the United Nations’ “Agenda 2030” Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) (https://sdgs.un.org/goals) and the UN’s partners at the World Economic Forum.

High-ranking members of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) within the United Nations system helped create the SDGs and currently help guide the organization in implementing the global plan. If their goals are achieved, UN-backed sustainability policies in agriculture and food production would lead to economic disaster, shortages of critical goods, widespread famine, and a dramatic loss of individual liberties.

Even private land ownership is under fire as global food production and the global economy transform to meet global sustainability goals. As explained by the United Nations on its SDGs website, the goals adopted in 2015 “build on decades of work by countries and the UN.”

The agreement known as Habitat I, captured as the Vancouver Declaration, stated that “land cannot be treated as an ordinary asset controlled by private individuals” and that private ownership of land is “a major means of wealth accumulation and concentration, thus contributing to social injustice”. “Public control of land use is therefore essential” and that by 2030 “it will not belong to anyone”.

The UN’s vision of “sustainability” has since included calls for drastic restrictions on energy, meat consumption, travel, living space and material well-being.

The world’s richest and most powerful corporate leaders are working with China and elsewhere in an effort to consolidate control of food production and crush independent farmers and ranchers. The goal is not at all to preserve the environment or fight climate change. Instead, the “sustainability” narrative and other justifications are a tool to gain control over food, agriculture, and people.

UN Sustainable Development Goals — Agenda 2030

The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, often referred to as the 2030 Agenda, were adopted in 2015 by the organization and its member states as a guide for “transforming the world.

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, often referred to as the 2030 Agenda, were adopted in 2015 by the organization and its member states as a guide for “transforming the world. Among other things, the UN plan calls for national and international redistribution of wealth in Goal 10, as well as “fundamental changes in the way our societies produce and consume goods and services.”

SDG number 12 calls for “sustainable consumption and production patterns”. In response to UN biodiversity agreements, the European Union has established several UN-supported biodiversity programs such as Natura 2000 and the EU Biodiversity Strategy 2030, which have been reported by the Dutch government and others in their agricultural policies.

The UN also publicly prides itself on its role in enforcing the SDGs in Sri Lanka and other nations suffering from food shortages and economic disasters linked to the same global sustainability agendas.

The role of the World Economic Forum (WEF)

The WEF—which from 2020 is promoting a total transformation of society known as the “Great Reset”—in 2019, signed a “strategic partnership” with the UN to promote the 2030 Agenda to the global business community. The formal agreement identified “areas of cooperation to deepen institutional engagement and jointly accelerate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.”

The WEF—which from 2020 is promoting a total transformation of society known as the “Great Reset”—in 2019, signed a “strategic partnership” with the UN to promote the 2030 Agenda to the global business community. The formal agreement identified “areas of cooperation to deepen institutional engagement and jointly accelerate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.”

The organization’s frequent references to “stakeholders” refer to governments, corporations and so-called non-governmental organizations that are often funded by the same corporations and governments. The Rockefeller Foundation is also a key player.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum on the “transformation of food systems and land use” at last year’s Davos Agenda Week, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte announced that the Netherlands will host the “Global Coordination Secretariat of Global Economic Food Innovation Hubs”. The secretariat, he said, “will connect all the other Food Innovation Hubs” in order to facilitate the creation of “the partnerships we need”.

Other organizations and entities involved in the push include powerful tax-exempt foundations such as the Gates Foundation, the EU-style regional governments that are proliferating around the world, and various groups funded by them.

Around the world, government policies aligned with the United Nations goals are squeezing farmers—especially smaller, independent producers who cannot absorb the added costs of additional regulation and control.

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